Articles matching the ‘Health Care’ Category

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August 30th, 2015

(Not) Doing the Retinal Exam, and the Importance of Acknowledging Limitations

This past week, the New England Journal of Medicine released one of its excellent instructional videos, detailing how to do direct ophthalmoscopy to examine the retina. That’s the use of one of those hand-held gizmos — an ophthalmoscope, see picture on the right — to look at the back of the eye. As usual, the video was […]


August 23rd, 2015

Post-Exposure Prophylaxis for HCV Can’t Be Cost-Effective — But We Might End Up Recommending It Anyway

An email query from a colleague: Hi Paul, Just got a call from one of our surgeons who got a needlestick from a suture needle, small amount of blood. Patient is HCV +. Any post-exposure prophylaxis recommended? Thanks, Dan The quick answer is no, it’s not recommended. From the guidelines: But it’s a natural question to ask for several reasons — […]


August 17th, 2015

Dog Days of Summer ID Link-o-Rama

A few ID/HIV items of note to consider as you gather up your sunscreen, flip flops, towels, and sand toys and head off to the beach: Interesting review of the impact of low socioeconomic status in the recent outbreak of Legionnaires’ Disease in the South Bronx. It’s just like (almost) every infection — the combined effects of crowding, poor sanitation, and […]


August 9th, 2015

The Pain — and Potential Power — of Electronic Health Records in One Little Anecdote

Here’s a scintillating series of events that happened recently on our inpatient consult service: Reason for consult: “Treatment of UTI in a 26-year-old pregnant woman with multiple allergies.” Culture result:  Group B strep, resistant to clindamycin and nitrofurantoin. She’s been on the latter. Patient’s allergies as listed on her chart:  Penicillins, cephalosporins, sulfonamides. Plan per OB service: […]


August 1st, 2015

Ten Reasons to Attend Our “Infectious Diseases in Primary Care” Course

With an up-front apology for the shameless plug — sorry! — here are 10 great reasons to attend our annual postgraduate course. It’s called Infectious Diseases in Primary Care, and takes place October 14-16 here at the Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel in Boston. All the topics are clinically relevant to day-to-day practice. Look at these topics! There’s a strict […]


July 26th, 2015

Really Rapid Review — IAS 2015, Vancouver

Vancouver will always have a special place in HIV treatment history. It was here, in 1996, that many of us first saw the potential of combination antiretroviral therapy to control this disease. Specifically, Study 035 of AZT, 3TC, and indinavir (presented by Trip Gulick) demonstrated the astounding finding that triple therapy induced sustained virologic suppression and dramatic immunologic improvement. Could it be that not everyone […]


July 18th, 2015

Disrupting the Normal Microbiota Might Make Us Fat, Allergic, Asthmatic, and Lead to Celiac Disease

Over at Open Forum Infectious Diseases, I recently had the opportunity to interview Dr. Martin Blaser, Professor of Medicine and Microbiology at New York University. He’s also the Director of the Human Microbiome Project, and author of the book, Missing Microbes: How the overuse of antibiotics is fueling our modern plagues. Marty has been a long-time champion of […]


July 11th, 2015

Citing WHO Guidelines, Squirrels Protest Latest Virus Discovery

An open letter to the Editor-in-Chief of the New England Journal of Medicine Saturday, July 11, 2015 Dear Dr. Drazen: On behalf of the International Association of Variegated Squirrels, I am writing to protest the article that appeared in your July 9 2015 issue, entitled “A variegated squirrel bornavirus associated with fatal human encephalitis.”  We variegated squirrels believe the title […]


July 7th, 2015

For HIV in the USA, Not in Care Exceeds the Undiagnosed — Solutions Welcome

In last week’s post, I asked about two of the key components of the HIV care cascade — the “undiagnosed” vs the “diagnosed but not in care,” and which group was larger in the USA. Here are your answers as of now: The people who read this site are a pretty knowledgeable group when it comes to […]


July 1st, 2015

Undiagnosed or Not in Care? For HIV, Which Is the Bigger Problem?

These days, it’s hard to have a “closed book” examination. The information is everywhere — on your computer, your phone, your tablet — whatever screen happens to be glowing in front of you. “In the age of the internet, why be wrong?” is something my son used to say as we sat at the dinner table, grappling […]


HIV Information: Author Paul Sax, M.D.

Paul E. Sax, MD

Contributing Editor

NEJM Journal Watch
Infectious Diseases

Biography | Disclosures | Summaries

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