Articles matching the ‘HIV’ Category

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September 8th, 2019

The Curious Case of M184V, Part 2 — and More!

The inspiration for today’s post comes from two recent emails from ID/HIV colleagues — thank you. Here’s the first, from Dr. Mehri McKellar from Duke: Hi Paul, When are you going to do part 2 of The Curious Case of M184V, Part 1? I am waiting patiently. 🙂 Mehri Mehri, wait no more, because here it is! […]


September 2nd, 2019

New Antibiotics for CRE, Draft Lyme Guidelines, Cost of Measles Outbreaks, and More — a Labor Day ID Link-o-Rama

Labor Day! Could summer really be over? Nah, we still have a few weeks — and as I’ve noted several times, this time of year (September-October) gives us far and away Boston’s best weather season. On with the links. Data from electronic medical records can accurately identify the best candidates for PrEP. The challenge in primary care is […]


August 18th, 2019

Choosing the Top Research Papers in HIV Medicine — and Recalling the Joy of Working with a Great ID Fellow

Way back in 2008 — the year I started writing here — I drafted an exceedingly long post listing the top published papers in HIV medicine. Oh how I tortured myself over that thing. How to define “Top”? Most cited? Most clinically important? Most rigorously scientific? Best written? After a while, I just abandoned the monstrosity. It still […]


July 28th, 2019

Really Rapid Review — IAS 2019 Mexico City

As I noted last week — and you did read last week’s post, didn’t you? — the International AIDS conference first took place in Mexico City in 2008. Last week we returned to this sprawling, vibrant city for the 2019 meeting. It was an excellent, well-run conference — with one small complaint. But more on that later… […]


July 21st, 2019

AIDS Conference Returns to Mexico City, Where We Saw an Underrated, Great Advance in HIV Therapy

If you’ve been an ID or HIV specialist for only a decade or so, the following statement might seem unfathomable to you: Until 2008, there were lots of people with HIV whose medication adherence was perfect — but they still had virologic failure. How could that be? The simple answer is that their virus had too […]


May 5th, 2019

Latest Published Study on HIV Treatment as Prevention Is DĂ©jĂ  Vu All Over Again, But Some News Is So Good It Never Gets Old

Even if you’re not an ID or HIV specialist, there’s an excellent chance you’ve heard of the PARTNER2 study, just published in The Lancet. If not, the title could not be more descriptive: Risk of HIV transmission through condomless sex in serodifferent gay couples with the HIV-positive partner taking suppressive antiretroviral therapy And, in case you’ve just […]


March 24th, 2019

Tetanus Case, No More MAC Prophylaxis, Playing in Dirt, and Low-Level Viremia — A National Puppy Day ID Link-O-Rama

In honor of spring (March 20), and the very important National Puppy Day (March 23), here are a bunch of ID and HIV-related recent items for consideration, contemplation, and perusal: A life-threatening case of tetanus in an unvaccinated boy highlights the personal and financial cost of the anti-vaccine movement. How deeply embedded are these false beliefs? The […]


March 18th, 2019

Just 1 Month of TB Preventive Therapy Works for People with HIV in TB-Endemic Regions — How About Other People in Other Places?

There’s a look our patients frequently give us when we tell them that preventive therapy for tuberculosis involves 9 months of treatment. If I were to put that look into words, they would be: Yikes, Doc, 9 months is waaay too long — you must be out of your mind. It’s the “9 months?!?!” face. We’ve […]


March 10th, 2019

Really Rapid Review — CROI 2019 Seattle

As a foot of wet snow bore down on Boston last week — see this post for why that matters — HIV researchers and policy makers headed to Seattle for this year’s Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, or CROI, which took place from March 4-7. And already I was feeling the pressure, based on this […]


March 3rd, 2019

A Few Thoughts on the Day Before CROI — Our Best (and Quirkiest) Scientific Meeting

As I’ve written here numerous times, the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections — or “CROI” (rhymes with “toy”) — is the best of the scientific meetings on HIV. It starts March 4 in Seattle. Bringing together the perfect blend of clinical, translational, and epidemiologic research, CROI consistently boasts the highest density of worthwhile content in any […]


HIV Information: Author Paul Sax, M.D.

Paul E. Sax, MD

Contributing Editor

NEJM Journal Watch
Infectious Diseases

Biography | Disclosures | Summaries

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