Posts Tagged ‘tenofovir’

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October 15th, 2017

The Best Antiretroviral Therapy for Pregnant Women? The Controversy Continues

There’s considerable controversy in an area of HIV medicine that one would think should be all but solved by now. It’s what HIV treatment we should give pregnant women. The issue isn’t how to prevent the virus from being transmitted to the newborn — suppress the virus in mom, baby doesn’t get it — it’s what’s safest […]


June 13th, 2013

PrEP Works in Injection Drug Users, CDC Offers “Guidance”

From The Lancet comes this important study of tenofovir pre-exposure prophylaxis for injection drug users (IDUs): In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we enrolled volunteers from 17 drug-treatment clinics in Bangkok, Thailand … We randomly assigned [2413] participants to either tenofovir or placebo … 50 became infected during follow-up: 17 in the tenofovir group and 33 […]


August 31st, 2012

“PEARLS” Study a Massive, Impressive Accomplishment

One of the most frequent criticisms of randomized clinical trials of HIV therapy is that certain patient groups — in particular gay men — are over represented compared to the HIV population as a whole. For example, in the recently published and presented clinical trials of the Quad and dolutegravir, women accounted for < 20% of […]


November 28th, 2011

Tenofovir Gel Disappointing in VOICE Trial

From the Microbicide Trials Network: VOICE, an HIV prevention trial that has been evaluating two antiretroviral (ARV)-based approaches for preventing the sexual transmission of HIV in women – daily use of one of two different ARV tablets or of a vaginal gel – will be dropping the vaginal gel from the study … The DSMB recommended […]


July 28th, 2011

Really Rapid Review — IAS 2011 Rome

Just back from IAS 2011 (which was followed, I’m thrilled to say, with a visit to perhaps the most beautiful region in the world). Here is a Really Rapid Review™ of the meeting, with apologies ahead of time for lack of organization and (even more likely) leaving out something important.  FYI, the abstracts are online […]


March 1st, 2011

Like It or Not, PrEP Enters the Clinic

Since the publication of iPrEx, the hypothetical decision about whether to prescribe pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has become a practical reality. As a result, we’ve posted a case on the Journal Watch/AIDS Clinical Care site, describing someone who requests intermittent pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV. It’s a high-risk, HIV-negative man who’s been treated several times with post-exposure prophylaxis. The case […]


March 28th, 2010

Kidneys: Fortunately, We Have Two

Here’s a case over in our Journal Watch: AIDS Clinical Care site:  a man with suspected PCP develops rapidly progressive renal failure after being starting on both empiric PCP treatment with TMP-SMX and ART with TDF/FTC plus darunavir/ritonavir. The specific questions at the end of the case were: What do you think is causing the renal failure? […]


February 28th, 2010

CROI 2010 Recap: No Obvious Blockbusters, But …

Ok, I’ll admit it — I didn’t see any studies presented at CROI this year that will immediately transform HIV care on a day-to-day basis.  Nothing that will alter practice right now. Nothing like last year’s NA-ACCORD, or 2008’s surprising DAD study, or 2007’s raltegravir studies, to name a few recent examples. (All subsequently published, of course — links are to […]


January 29th, 2009

Too Many Options: What Actually Happened

We recently published a case in AIDS Clinical Care entitled “Too Many Options”, describing a patient with longstanding HIV infection, virologic failure, and resistance to NRTIs, NNRTIs, and PIs. Fortunately, resistance and tropism testing gave him several options for a new drug regimen — including darunavir, etravirine, maraviroc, enfuvirtide, and — if one believes phenotypic NRTI […]


HIV Information: Author Paul Sax, M.D.

Paul E. Sax, MD

Contributing Editor

NEJM Journal Watch
Infectious Diseases

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