Articles matching the ‘Medical Education’ Category

November 29th, 2022

#IDTwitter — Still a Wonderful and Entertaining Place to Learn

Twitter is much in the news recently, mostly for not-good reasons. Rather than rehash-tag (see what I did there?) its various struggles and controversies since the new owner took over, I’m going to let others cover that territory. Instead, I’d like to go in a different direction, and share how this site remains one of the […]


November 21st, 2022

Five ID Things to Be Grateful For, 2022 Edition

In what’s something of a holiday tradition on this site, I hereby present 5 ID things we can be grateful for as we prepare for the best holiday of the year. Why the best? Family and friends. A nice big meal, with something for everyone. (My family of four has two vegetarians — they have plenty […]


November 7th, 2022

Five Quick Questions from Our Course, “ID in Primary Care”

As noted on this site before, we put on a course called “ID in Primary Care” every year for clinicians doing truly the hardest job in medicine — frontline primary care. Why is their work so challenging? While we can focus on one field, infectious diseases, they have to be aware of everything. Tough task indeed. We’ve […]


October 17th, 2022

Big In-Person Medical Meetings and Cognitive Dissonance for ID Docs

Dissonance: lack of agreement; inconsistency between the beliefs one holds or between one’s actions and one’s beliefs; a mingling of sounds that strike the ear harshly. It started shortly after the chaotic, disruptive, and all together unpleasant Omicron wave of 2021–22. It continued through the BA.2 and BA.5 surges, and now plays on through the swarm of […]


July 22nd, 2022

The Paperwork Demands for Academic Medical Teaching Are OUT OF CONTROL

Why all caps in the above title? It’s to call attention to a problem that’s getting worse each year in academic medicine, especially when it involves teaching or talks. The requirement to submit a veritable truckload of forms, documents, attestations, and summaries, all due months before the actual event. Let’s explore in more detail what this might […]


July 1st, 2022

Fellowship Transition and Developing a Sense of Belonging

It’s July 1, which means that today, or sometime very soon, many internal medicine residents will transition to becoming subspecialty fellows. There are many appropriate words to describe this change, including exciting, nerve-wracking, and challenging, but one that doesn’t get quite enough attention is how strangely lonely it feels. The reason this sensation occurs is because […]


May 23rd, 2022

In Praise of Dr. Glaucomflecken

Sometimes there is someone so good at something that there is universal agreement we are witnessing something special. Babe Ruth, Serena Williams, and Michael Jordan competing at their peaks. Charles Dickens or Jane Austen creating whole worlds out of invented characters and plots. Vladimir Horowitz performing Rachmaninoff at Carnegie Hall. Bernini creating sculptures from cold, hard […]


March 22nd, 2022

What Have We Learned from the Pandemic So Far?

Dear Readers, I need your help. Recently one of my colleagues reached out and asked if I could give a talk to his research group. “Just give one of your canned Covid talks,” he said. Ha. Needless to say — but I will say it anyway — he’s not an ID doctor. Otherwise he’d know that, as I’ve said […]


January 28th, 2022

Required Learning Modules and How to Make People Learn

Like thousands of others who work in my organization, I’ve just finished a stultifying annual task — several hours of required online learning modules that must be completed to keep my job. How much do we look forward to them? Think annual car inspections, or tax returns, and multiply the boredom factor several-fold. You might not be […]


December 13th, 2021

ID Learning Units from Inpatient ID Consults

Need a break from all-things COVID-19? Feeling OH-verwhelmed by OH-muh-kron? (I guess that’s how some pronounce it … or AWE-mee-kron… or oh-MIKE-ron … or who knows. Two things for sure — there’s no “n” after the “m”, and it’s a drag regardless of how it’s pronounced.) To cheer everyone up, here’s a palate cleanser of non-COVID-19 ID Learning Units […]


HIV Information: Author Paul Sax, M.D.

Paul E. Sax, MD

Contributing Editor

NEJM Journal Watch
Infectious Diseases

Biography | Disclosures | Summaries

Learn more about HIV and ID Observations.