February 17th, 2020

Short-Course Treatment of Latent TB, Combination Therapy for Staph Bacteremia, Adult Vaccine Guidelines, Novel Antifungals, and Others — A Non-COVID-19 ID Link-o-Rama

National Association for the Prevention of Tuberculosis, 1910.

There’s so much out there right now on COVID-19 (the disease) and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus) that the other ID news gets crowded out.

Which means it’s time for non-COVID-19 ID/HIV Link-o-Rama! I haven’t done one of these in a while, so there’s plenty of material in the vaults yearning to be free.

Adi was kind enough to join me on an OFID podcast to discuss what motivates and inspires him to post these memes — highly recommended!

2 Responses to “Short-Course Treatment of Latent TB, Combination Therapy for Staph Bacteremia, Adult Vaccine Guidelines, Novel Antifungals, and Others — A Non-COVID-19 ID Link-o-Rama”

  1. Dr C says:

    Can you comment on the new “soft” recommendation on PCV13? As a general internist with a large geriatric population, I’m generally in the “more [inactive] vaccines more better” camp. I have a great schpiel explaining that it’s highly immunogenic and may cause a localized reaction, and patients seem to be fine with that. The cost effectiveness argument is pretty much a non starter in shared decision making conversations. So… what’s the downside?

  2. Loretta S says:

    I have whiplash from the PCV-13 recommendation. First we had to explain to our older adults why we were recommending an additional “pneumonia shot”, as all of my patients refer to it. Now it’s, “Never mind”. I read the MMWR with the background and explanation for both the recommendation and then the removal of the recommendation, but I still feel whiplashed, considering the recommendation changed in just 5 years.

    Very good news about the zoster vaccine and stroke! Yet another point to bring up when discussing the benefits of the vaccine with the patient. Along with the not-so-fun side effects some of them will have, of course.

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HIV Information: Author Paul Sax, M.D.

Paul E. Sax, MD

Contributing Editor

NEJM Journal Watch
Infectious Diseases

Biography | Disclosures | Summaries

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