March 10th, 2019

Really Rapid Review — CROI 2019 Seattle

As a foot of wet snow bore down on Boston last week — see this post for why that matters — HIV researchers and policy makers headed to Seattle for this year’s Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, or CROI, which took place from March 4-7.

And already I was feeling the pressure, based on this one little nudge:

OK, @Aishalton, here you go with some of the highlights. And it’s not just a rapid review, but a Really Rapid Review®!

I can never cover everything, so to all brilliant readers — please use the comments section for things I’ve missed, general comments, and questions.

Look, even though your Netflix beckons, if you have a few moments, the following webcasts by experts on diverse topics are must watch for any HIV/ID specialist. I’m listing below my favorites, with the caveat that I couldn’t see all the talks and might have missed some other gem:

So, what did I miss? Let me have it.

 

4 Responses to “Really Rapid Review — CROI 2019 Seattle”

  1. although some services offer genetic testing it is difficult to see what benefit this would give an individual. Even if someone has a genetic resistance to most HIV infections, they can still be infected by other strains. i-Base doesn’t provide links to commercial sites unless there is a therapeutic need for HIV positive people.

  2. Lisa Greisman says:

    Paul,
    Wonderful Rapid Review, as always!! Thanks so much!
    One thing I would add: as you know, TAF has been shown to have low levels in female cervical and vaginal fluid/tissues, and DISCOVER did not include cis-women. Hence, although TAF/FTC looks great for MSM and TG women, I would NOT use for any cis-women at this point in time. (Unless I have missed new data of TAF use as PrEP in women??)

  3. P Marks says:

    My question concenrs point of care viral load testing. I am not an ID doc or HIv provider. Is this currently done in the US? If not are there plans to pilot this in citirs with high prevalence in the US?

  4. L. Linares-Hengen says:

    Thanks, Paul!

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HIV Information: Author Paul Sax, M.D.

Paul E. Sax, MD

Contributing Editor

NEJM Journal Watch
Infectious Diseases

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