Posts Tagged ‘bare metal stents’

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October 29th, 2012

Selections from Richard Lehman’s Literature Review: October 29th

This week’s topics include CV risk factors and peripheral artery disease in men, radiofrequency ablation in paroxysmal AF, CPR duration and survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest, an everolimus-eluting stent vs. a bare-metal stent in STEMI, job strain and CHD, and more.


August 28th, 2012

Selections from Richard Lehman’s Literature Review: August 28th

This week’s topics include studies on biolimus-eluting stents vs. bare-metal stents, risk markers to improve CV event prediction, common carotid intima-media thickness and CV risk prediction, aspirin with alteplase for acute ischemic stroke, and lipid-lowering therapy (and its benefits and harms) in patients with CKD.


August 23rd, 2012

New DES Get COMFORTABLE with AMI

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The use of drug-eluting stents (DES) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has recently generated concern. In two meta-analyses (De Luca et al and Kaleson et al) , the use of early-generation DES resulted in a lower risk of repeat revascularization compared with bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with AMI, but the DES group had a 2-fold increased […]


August 20th, 2012

Selections from Richard Lehman’s Literature Review: August 20th

This week’s topics include studies on the benefits of drug-eluting vs. bare-metal stents, using walking speed and blood pressure measurements to predict mortality in the elderly, stroke and bleeding in AF with chronic kidney disease, and the diagnosis and management of peripheral artery disease.


August 2nd, 2012

DES in Patients at Low Risk for TVR: Is the Benefit Worth the Cost? (Part III)

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In a recent article in Archives of Internal Medicine, researchers performed an analysis of current use of drug-eluting stents (DES) in patients at various levels of risk for target-vessel revascularization (TVR), and estimated the cost and clinical outcomes of using BMS rather than DES in patients at low risk (see News). To gauge reaction to […]


July 27th, 2012

DES in Patients at Low Risk for TVR: Is the Benefit Worth the Cost? (Part II)

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In a recent article in Archives of Internal Medicine, researchers performed an analysis of current use of drug-eluting stents (DES) in patients at various levels of risk for target-vessel revascularization (TVR), and estimated the cost and clinical outcomes of using BMS rather than DES in patients at low risk (see News). To gauge reaction to […]


July 25th, 2012

DES in Patients at Low Risk for TVR: Is the Benefit Worth the Cost? (Part I)

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In a recent article in Archives of Internal Medicine, researchers performed an analysis of current use of drug-eluting stents (DES) in patients at various levels of risk for target-vessel revascularization (TVR), and estimated the cost and clinical outcomes of using BMS rather than DES in patients at low risk (see News). To gauge reaction to […]


July 10th, 2012

Drug-Eluting Stents Often Used in Patients at Low Risk for Restenosis

The chief advantage of drug-eluting stents (DES) over bare-metal stents is that they significantly reduce the risk for restenosis. The chief disadvantages of DES are their greater cost and the requirement for prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy after implantation. In a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine,  Amit Amin and colleagues analyzed data from 1.5 million […]


April 30th, 2012

Selections from Richard Lehman’s Literature Review: Week of April 30th

This week, Richard looks at endocarditis and ICDs, more stent wars, stroke prevention in A-Fib, and more.


April 24th, 2012

Primary PCI Meta-Analysis: Mortality Trumps All

In a new meta-analysis Dr. Gregg Stone and members of the Drug-Eluting Stent in Primary Angioplasty (DESERT) Cooperation concluded that reduction in target-vessel revascularization (TVR) associated with drug-eluting stents (DES) in primary PCI provided a powerful reason for continued use of DES in primary PCI. An accompanying editorial by James Brophy focused on several potential DES weaknesses in the study. […]