Articles matching the ‘Patient Care’ Category

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October 17th, 2017

Emergency Medicine: A Life of Interruption

Emergency medicine is a life of interruption. Physicians, nurses, PAs, radiology techs, registration clerks: we are all constantly interrupted or interrupting. Unfortunately, interruptions and distractions and the consequent attention shift may lead to error. Sometimes, we fail to return to the original task, make an error in that task, or waste time on less urgent […]


October 5th, 2017

An Old Procedure, A New Beginning

“My heart hurts,” said Brooklyn, then three years old, as she grabbed her chest and sat down. Quickly checking the girl over, Brooklyn’s parents felt her heart indeed pounding in her chest, and took her to the emergency department. There, they were shocked to hear that their daughter was in cardiac arrest. Shortly afterward, Brooklyn […]


September 29th, 2017

I’ll Take “Nursing Ethics” for $200, Alex

First I noticed it all over my social media feed — the story of Alex Wubbels, a burn unit nurse at a university hospital in Utah who was arrested and manhandled by police for not allowing them to take a sample of blood from an unconscious patient without a warrant. Then came a slew of […]


September 15th, 2017

Curbside Consultations: Checks and Balances

A 34-year-old male presents to the emergency department with right arm weakness. He woke up 2 days ago unable to move his arm. The patient reports having hypertension but has no history of diabetes, stroke, cardiac disease or tobacco use. He drinks alcohol daily. The patient complains of numbness and tingling in his arm. He […]


September 1st, 2017

Obesity Counseling: Getting Real

“Your BMI puts you in the obese category. You need to limit weight gain to 10 pounds this pregnancy.” As the obstetrician’s words sunk in, I was overcome with embarrassment. Sure, I knew I was overweight, but I was pregnant. And according to my BMI, I have been “obese” for years. But this was the first […]


August 17th, 2017

Primary Care’s Got Talent

There is one hour each day in the office that I refer to as the “golden hour” – from 6:30 to 7:30, either AM or PM. For the sake of my personal life, most days I aim to be at my desk for one of those two slots but not both. During this time, I’m usually […]


August 9th, 2017

Curing the Culture — A Gentle Nudge

You and I have covered a lot of ground this year. We exposed the fallout of a toxic workplace culture and discussed some of the first steps we can take to fix it. We reestablished respect for our patients. We adjusted some of the biggest problems with our sign-out process. We reminded ourselves of the power […]


August 3rd, 2017

“As I Lay Dying” — Patient Readmission and Non-Compliance

As I tie the last knot in a neat row of nine sutures, the night nurse calls me to room two. I  drop my hemostats, peel off my gloves, and tell my patient I will be back. Across the hall, I find a girl thrashing around the gurney, chest heaving up and down, hands clasped around her […]


July 26th, 2017

When a Child Receives Care at a non-Children’s Hospital

In a recent post, I wrote about my niece’s episode of appendicitis. Another part of that story relates to her post-op course. When my sister first called asking my advice on whether or not her daughter needed to be treated, I didn’t specify where she should take her. She ended up going to a general […]


June 27th, 2017

Bring Back the Letter of Condolence

I don’t remember the first time I watched someone die. I don’t remember the second or third time either. But I know it happened when I was 24 years old, and I know that, afterward, I went home, ate dinner, and went to sleep. The next morning I woke up, put on a clean pair […]


NP/PA Bloggers

NP/PA Bloggers

Elizabeth Donahue, RN, MSN, NP‑C
Alexandra Godfrey, BSc PT, MS PA‑C
Emily F. Moore, RN, MSN, CPNP‑PC, CCRN
Harrison Reed, PA‑C

Advanced practice clinicians treating patients in a variety of settings and specialties

Learn more about In Practice: Reflections from NPs and PAs.