Posts Tagged ‘MRSA’

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November 20th, 2016

Seven ID/HIV Things to Be Grateful For This Holiday Season, 2016 Edition

I know, I know — you read that title and thought, “Grateful now? He must be out of his mind.” But with the (unsurprising) concession that I too felt that watching the election returns was akin to witnessing a slowly developing and incomprehensible train wreck, I remind you that the expression of gratitude is well known to make you happier. […]


July 31st, 2016

Summertime Pre-Olympics ID Link-o-Rama

If you’re wondering what to do between the end of the presidential conventions, the baseball trade deadline tomorrow, and the start of the Summer Olympics, here are a few ID/HIV related items to contemplate: Non-travel related Zika arrives in Florida. Start getting used to seeing more of that obscure word “autochthonous”.  The uncertainty was not whether Zika cases would occur here — that […]


August 17th, 2015

Dog Days of Summer ID Link-o-Rama

A few ID/HIV items of note to consider as you gather up your sunscreen, flip flops, towels, and sand toys and head off to the beach: Interesting review of the impact of low socioeconomic status in the recent outbreak of Legionnaires’ Disease in the South Bronx. It’s just like (almost) every infection — the combined effects of crowding, poor sanitation, and […]


October 19th, 2014

Almost Filovirus-Free (That is, Ebola-Free) ID Link-o-Rama

If you’re an ID doctor right now, the filovirus of the moment Ebola is consuming a big chunk of all of your non-clinical time — and this is particularly true for those heavily involved in Infection Control, who are spending every waking hour responding to public hysteria, to various clinicians who seem to have all the answers, and to ever […]


January 30th, 2014

Unanswerable Questions in Infectious Diseases: Persistent MRSA Bacteremia

Ok, here’s a favorite of adult ID specialists everywhere — a real tough one. The case goes something like this: Older person, many medical problems. Probably is on hemodialysis, with the vascular surgeons having some difficulty with access. There’s diabetes, of course, and cardiovascular disease, and oh yeah, a mechanical aortic valve that’s around 10 years […]


September 13th, 2013

Clindamycin vs. TMP/SMX for Soft Tissue Infections: A Clinical Trial That Needs Some Marketing

At ICAAC this week — the ID conference with the most inscrutable acronym out there — Loren Miller from UCLA presented a clinical trial on treatment of skin and soft tissue infections that has widespread clinical applications, yet may receive little if any attention. And why is that? Simply because the drugs (clindamycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) have been off-patent […]


October 11th, 2012

Back to School: Questions at the “ID in Primary Care” Course

We do a post-graduate course each year called “ID in Primary Care,” and it’s a great way for us to find out what people in outpatient primary care practice are thinking about from the ID perspective. I told the participants this year I’d post some of their most interesting questions on this site, with the hope that […]


June 15th, 2012

ID Learning Unit — The D Test

I suppose it’s not surprising that we’d follow-up the Etest with the D test, though perhaps if I were being alphabetical, the order would have been reversed. The D test is important, because it screens for a form of clindamycin resistance in MRSA that might otherwise not be detected — the “inducible” kind, which can be […]


June 6th, 2012

A Fun Internet Poll for ID Nerds

Over on Medscape, one of my ID heroes, John Bartlett, has a new series called, “The Medscape Awards in Infectious Diseases” and it looks like a winner. Here’s how it works: The Medscape Awards in Infectious Diseases is a new series that will honor the greatest achievements in the field of infectious diseases during 1980-2012. John G. […]


February 12th, 2012

Impossible Curbside at Medical Grand Rounds

Scene:  Medical Grand Rounds, 5 minutes before the start. Lecture is on coronary artery disease, which may have a link to Infectious Disease even if it isn’t actually caused by Chlamydia pneumoniae or CMV after all. A well-regarded, experienced primary care physician (PCP) approaches. PCP: Hi Paul, I have quick question*. [*Curbsiders often use this exact phrase — and rarely does […]


HIV Information: Author Paul Sax, M.D.

Paul E. Sax, MD

Contributing Editor

NEJM Journal Watch
Infectious Diseases

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