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Posts Tagged ‘antibiotics’

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February 13th, 2014

Jeter is Retiring, and Certain ID Doctors Are Getting Old(er)

It’s safe to say that most of the perspectives on Derek Jeter’s retiring from baseball will not be written by ID doctors, so let me seize the opportunity. And since it’s always risky to dwell on players from a certain team while living in Boston — I have friends for whom a central component of [...]


May 16th, 2013

ID Learning Unit — Antibiotics with Excellent Oral Absorption

Guaranteed:  Every day at a hospital near you, a patient is receiving antibiotic therapy for an infection, and the orders include the following: A slew of various oral medications, both continued from outpatient care and started anew on admission. An intravenous antibiotic. The odd thing about this combination is that there are many antibiotics with [...]


January 21st, 2013

Must-Read Piece: “Fever of Too Many Origins”

Every so often a commentary gets something just right, and fortunately we have an example in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine. Entitled “Fever of Unknown Origin or Fever of Too Many Origins?”, it’s the best depiction I’ve read about doing ID consults in the intensive care unit (ICU). The author, Harold Horowitz (who has [...]


September 11th, 2012

Are Fluoroquinolones Really More Dangerous Than Other Antibiotics?

In today’s New York Times, health writer Jane Brody slams quinolone antibiotics: Part of the problem is that fluoroquinolones are often inappropriately prescribed. Instead of being reserved for use against serious, perhaps life-threatening bacterial infections like hospital-acquired pneumonia, these antibiotics are frequently prescribed for sinusitis, bronchitis, earaches and other ailments that may resolve on their own or can [...]


March 30th, 2012

Our Obsession with Dental Antibiotic Prophylaxis and an E-mail from Mom

I have a regular, highly efficient email correspondence with my mother — who never really liked talking on the phone to begin with (neither do I), so email is perfect for us. The topics we cover are mostly family stuff, and food — she’s a food writer, after all, so it might be a recipe [...]


February 14th, 2012

Is It Time To Stop Treating Acute Sinusitis?

From the pages of JAMA comes this startling clinical trial: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of adults with uncomplicated, acute rhinosinusitis [who] were recruited from 10 community practices in Missouri between November 1, 2006, and May 1, 2009 … [Subjects received a] ten-day course of either amoxicillin (1500 mg/d) or placebo administered in 3 doses per day … There was [...]


August 31st, 2011

It’s Time for Antibiotic Placebos

As I’m sure you all agree, it’s high time we had a good antibiotic placebo. Just think — we’d be able to prescribe a 100% effective treatment for viral respiratory tract infections, with the assurance of no risk of antibiotic resistance, C diff, allergic reactions, tendon ruptures, photosensitivity, drug-drug interactions, or any of the myriad [...]


December 9th, 2010

Chronic Lyme Tough to Diagnose, Tough to Treat

Over at the Chicago Tribune, there is this superb review of the Chronic Lyme disease issue. Lyme disease is real. The bacterial infection, chiefly transmitted by deer ticks, can cause rashes, swollen joints and inflamed nerves, and usually is curable with a round of antibiotics. But doctors around the country are telling patients with common [...]


November 17th, 2010

Ferlater Antibiotics

In this absolutely hysterical, laugh-out-loud comedy routine, Mal Z. Lawrence describes a woman at a Catskill hotel, piling danish into her handbag. She calls them “ferlater danish” — as opposed to the ones she’s eating at breakfast, those are “fernow.” Did you ever have one of your patients request “ferlater” antibiotics?  That is, ask that [...]


October 22nd, 2010

How to Figure Out the Length of Antibiotic Therapy

One thing we ID doctors know — that other clinicians simply don’t — is how long to treat a patient with antibiotics. I was reminded of this special power by these recent events: An excellent fellow from the hospital’s Critical Care program rotated through our division recently.  When asked about what she wanted learn from the [...]


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Paul E. Sax, MD

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