Articles matching the ‘Medical Education’ Category

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August 9th, 2015

The Pain — and Potential Power — of Electronic Health Records in One Little Anecdote

Here’s a scintillating series of events that happened recently on our inpatient consult service: Reason for consult: “Treatment of UTI in a 26-year-old pregnant woman with multiple allergies.” Culture result:  Group B strep, resistant to clindamycin and nitrofurantoin. She’s been on the latter. Patient’s allergies as listed on her chart:  Penicillins, cephalosporins, sulfonamides. Plan per OB service: […]


August 1st, 2015

Ten Reasons to Attend Our “Infectious Diseases in Primary Care” Course

With an up-front apology for the shameless plug — sorry! — here are 10 great reasons to attend our annual postgraduate course. It’s called Infectious Diseases in Primary Care, and takes place October 14-16 here at the Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel in Boston. All the topics are clinically relevant to day-to-day practice. Look at these topics! There’s a strict […]


June 20th, 2015

Alex Rodriguez’ Story Reminds Me of a Case of Scientific Misconduct — Until It Doesn’t

If you’ll forgive me a bit of baseball-related rambling, there’s an incredible story going on this year with the resuscitation of Alex Rodriguez, both as a player and, even more remarkably, as a person in the public eye. Or, to quote the play-by-play announcer Michael Kay, who on Friday got it perfectly when he commented on A-Rod’s 3000th hit […]


June 4th, 2015

A Slightly Less Painful Way to Learn the Three-Letter Abbreviations for HIV Meds

One of the stupid things about being an HIV/ID specialist is the highly arcane code we use to abbreviate HIV treatments. Why was zidovudine originally AZT, and now ZDV? Why is lamivudine 3TC? And tenofovir TDF? Of course there are legitimate biochemical reasons why these are the right abbreviations, but they are lost to most of us who do […]


March 21st, 2015

ID Learning Unit: Coagulase-Negative Staph, and the “Anti-Zebra” Residents’ Report

At the risk of betraying a deep streak of nerdiness, I confess to being a huge fan of Residents’ Report. This infatuation goes back to my medical student days, when the occasional chance to watch the Chief Medical Resident — who seemed the smartest doctor on the planet — lead a discussion of an interesting case inspired […]


October 25th, 2014

What Makes An Ideal Applicant for a Fellowship in Infectious Diseases?

We’re at the tail end of the ID fellowship interview process, and am pleased to report we’ve seen some outstanding applicants. They know that our field is the most interesting in medicine, and they view our recent “Epidemic of Epidemics” — to coin a phrase from John Bartlett to describe all this activity (Ebola, MERS, Enterovirus D68, […]


October 6th, 2014

Back to School: Questions from “ID in Primary Care” Course

Just wrapped our our annual postgraduate course, “Infectious Diseases in Primary Care,” where each year we get together with primary care providers (doctors, nurses, PAs) and review what we hope are the most clinically relevant topics in ID. And each year we get a great bunch of questions, some of which I’ve listed below (along with […]


May 28th, 2014

Some ID Stuff We’re Talking About on Rounds

Just finished two weeks on the inpatient general medical service — hence the radio silence — giving me a chance to work with residents, interns, and medical students. Here’s a smattering of the ID topics we discussed, along with a comment or two: “Common” causes of gram negative soft tissue infection (at least for board exam purposes), and […]


January 30th, 2014

Unanswerable Questions in Infectious Diseases: Persistent MRSA Bacteremia

Ok, here’s a favorite of adult ID specialists everywhere — a real tough one. The case goes something like this: Older person, many medical problems. Probably is on hemodialysis, with the vascular surgeons having some difficulty with access. There’s diabetes, of course, and cardiovascular disease, and oh yeah, a mechanical aortic valve that’s around 10 years […]


January 21st, 2014

Unanswerable Questions in Infectious Diseases: The Positive Cultures for Candida in an ICU Patient

OK, gang. You did such a bang-up job on Question #1 that I can’t resist getting another consult. Here’s the case:  Patient in intensive care, has been there for some time — at least a week, probably weeks. Perhaps he/she had surgery (especially abdominal surgery) that didn’t go well, or has severe cardiovascular disease, or multiple […]


HIV Information: Author Paul Sax, M.D.

Paul E. Sax, MD

Contributing Editor

NEJM Journal Watch
Infectious Diseases

Biography | Disclosures | Summaries

Learn more about HIV and ID Observations.