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Posts Tagged ‘resident blog’

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October 6th, 2014

Introducing Myself

Priya Umapathi, M.D.

Hello! I’m excited to have an opportunity to share my adventures, experiences, and opinions from chief year with you. Transitioning between life phases can be traumatic at times, but invariably bears great potential for exponential self–growth. This year, so far, has confirmed that there is indeed much growing to be done! We held a transition event […]


October 6th, 2014

NEJM Journal Watch Welcomes Priya Umapathi, MD

Charleen Hamilton

The editors and staff of NEJM Journal Watch welcome Dr. Priya Umapathi as our new Chief Resident blogger. Priya will be sharing her experiences as a teacher and mentor at Rutgers.


September 3rd, 2013

Benefits and Perils of Following the Literature Too Closely

Paul Bergl, M.D.

As a resident, probably the most common piece of feedback one receives is, “Read more and expand your clinical knowledge base.” This critique is a standard and generic piece of feedback to encourage the younger generation to never quit in the endless pursuit of knowledge. As our erudite attendings know, medical knowledge always evolves and […]


August 2nd, 2013

A Time of Transition

Jonathan Schwartz

August is here, and we are deep in the throes of a new academic year.  With this annual cycle, we deal with transitions in the academic medical world – many of which seem somewhat painful at first glance but, on closer inspection,  actually can be quite fun.  Many of you in medical training undoubtedly have moved into new roles: […]


May 24th, 2013

The MICU Rotation — Oh, no!

Jonathan Schwartz

After a well-received post last week that focused on a commonly asked question I have fielded this year, I thought another common question would make for an excellent topic this week.  We’ll focus on the MICU rotation from the resident (and, potentially, the medical student) perspective. The MICU can be one of, if not the most, […]


May 15th, 2013

The Next Step: Fellowship Applications

Jonathan Schwartz

The end of the academic year is fast-approaching, which means many changes and exciting transitions lie ahead – for all levels of trainees: medical students and new interns, brand-new attending physicians, and seasoned diagnosticians alike.  One of the more stressful tasks facing many of the senior residents in the coming months is the fellowship application […]


October 20th, 2011

Shifting Times

Gopi Astik, MD

Anyone involved in academic medicine probably is aware of the new ACGME duty-hour restrictions that went into effect  on 7/1/2011. For those of you who aren’t, the new guidelines state that PGY1 residents cannot work for longer than 16 hours straight. If they do work longer, they require strategic uninterrupted naps. The restrictions on PGY2 […]


September 30th, 2011

Hello, Journal Watch Readers!

Heidi Zook, MD

Hello Journal Watch readers! My name is Heidi Zook, and I am thrilled to have the opportunity to share my thoughts and opinions with all of you for the next year. I am one of the current chief residents at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, so my viewpoint is that of a junior faculty, recent […]


September 26th, 2011

Hello, Everyone!

Gopi Astik, MD

Hello, everyone, my name is Gopi Astik, and I am one of the internal medicine chief residents at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Our program has 4th-year chiefs, so I have completed my residency and am excited to be able to share the experience of my transition from resident to new faculty with all of […]


August 17th, 2011

Transition — A Note from the Journal Watch Editors

Charleen Hamilton

First, Journal Watch would like to thank Dr. Greg Bratton for helping us to establish our Chief Resident blog. Greg has moved on to a Sports Medicine fellowship, but we’ll try to convince him to post his most interesting cases and insights as he continues his medical training. Second, we’re very happy to announce that […]


Resident Blogger

Priya Umapathi, M.D.

Resident Blogger

NEJM Journal Watch General Medicine

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