Ahmad Yousaf, MD

Ahmad Yousaf, MD

Ahmad Yousaf was born and raised in New Jersey. He studied Biomedical Engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and then graduated from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. He stayed at Rutgers to complete a residency in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics and has elected to stay 1 more year to be the Ambulatory Chief of Internal Medicine. His major life accomplishments include marrying a beautiful orthodontist who provides him with free dental care and having a rambunctious 1-year-old daughter who occupies most of their free time. He plans on staying within academic primary care or hospitalist medicine. He enjoys spoken word poetry, sports, and teaching.

All posts by Ahmad Yousaf, MD

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June 24th, 2016

The Scam of Medicine

“Oh no, she’s calling again.” I look at the caller ID in the Chiefs’ office where I sit with one of my co-Chiefs.  It is the Documentation Lady. Her call is as regular as BMs with C. diff: Profuse, excessive, associated with a lot of hot air and a bunch of crap, but inevitable. We play […]


June 17th, 2016

My Last Day in Greece

Reflections and observations from my last day in Greece as part of the SAMS (Syrian American Medical Society) medical mission for Syrian refugees: 1) It rained during clinic hours. It was a bit inconvenient for the team. For the refugees, it was catastrophic. Their tents, already damaged, allow the drops of precipitation to find their ways in and soak […]


May 23rd, 2016

My Third Day in Greece

1) At one point today in the Idomini refugee camp, I was playing catch with a beautiful baby girl in between some of the tents. She could not have been much older than my own daughter and, like my daughter, would throw the ball backwards over her head instead of towards me and then would […]


May 22nd, 2016

My Second Day in Greece

1) The following are real conversations the team has had with patients/refugees in our short time here: Young lady who came in with urinary symptoms: “How old are you?” “I am 27 years old… I hope this is the last year of my life.”   Teenage male: “I have to get out of here. I’ve spent 3 months of my […]


May 21st, 2016

My First Day in Greece

I am participating in the SAMS (Syrian American Medical Society) medical mission in Greece. 1) Loneliness is truly the darkest consequence of this crisis. The Syrian people haven’t just been kicked out of their homes. They were stripped away from their neighborhoods, friends, and family via death, destruction, sickness, and tough decisions that they had to make about splitting […]


May 20th, 2016

Traveling Can Be Frustrating

Note from the NEJM Journal Watch staff — Ahmad Yousaf is currently on a trip to help care for refugees in Greece. He is sending daily updates to share his thoughts; we will be posting them here daily.   The discomforts of travel are real. Stress, related to the unknown: flight times, traffic to the airport, crying babies, […]


May 6th, 2016

Declaration of Death

“Is he dead?” I stepped up closer. He was yellow. Bright yellow. Steve had been admitted to the hospital for altered mental status when his last PET Scan revealed that the pancreatic cancer had spread from the tail of his pancreas into his liver where it now blocked the ducts that carried the bile out of […]


April 27th, 2016

The Dark Side of Medicine

The following is paraphrased documentation, authored by a physician I know, regarding an intoxicated patient in the ER: 1AM: Patient is telling nurse, “Before I leave, I need everyone’s name for my lawsuit. Tell the phlebotomist that if he’s good, he’ll  get a cut.” 1:40AM: Patient is making inappropriate sexual comments and is verbally aggressive with medical staff. He […]


April 8th, 2016

The Costs of Being a Doctor

I start this article with a disclaimer: I am not here to comment on the decreasing salaries of physicians or the knowledge that I will never get paid the way the prior generation of doctors got paid. It is hard for me (and the American public) to feel bad for anybody making more than $200K […]


March 14th, 2016

The Era of the Ill-Prepared Medical Student

What is wrong with medical students nowadays? This question has been circulating in the academic medical world for years. As an intern and resident, I would hear complaints about how ‘unready’ they seemed. The grievances often include adjectives like ill-prepared, lazy,  or uninterested.  The complaints have burgeoned over time, and the examples are numerous in my institution: Students show […]


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